Todd Finn -  RE/MAX Partners



Posted by Todd Finn on 5/20/2018

Carpeting gets a bad rep. As you well know from house hunting, or will soon find out, wood floors are valued far more. While wood flooring may be, debatably, easier to maintain and keep a low allergen profile, itís expensive to install or restore. Carpeting adds warmth, softness, and flair to a room. So letís put the arguments against carpeting to rest. Hereís how to properly care for and maintain carpeting.

Shoes off - This one should be a rule no matter your flooring choice if you want to maintain a tidy home. With that said, prevent visible track lines along your homeís most common traffic patterns. Create a designated place for family members to place their shoes sets your household up for success for instilling a no shoe rule. Be everyone favorite host and keep a basket of fresh socks and sandals for guests who arenít the shoeless type.

Vacuum frequently - Meaning at least once a week. Keep dirt, crumbs, and dander from becoming ground down into your carpeting. Investing in a robotic vacuum will allow you to schedule a few clean times each week without having to lift a finger. And with AI on the rise, you can now control most from your home; which means if you have unexpected guests swinging by you can send a signal to your vacuum to get to work whether youíre in bed, at work or running to the store to pick up items for dinner.

Spot clean properly - Knowing how to properly spot clean any spills or messes is critical. For example, never rub or grind down when cleaning always gently sweep in upward motions to clean up before stains set in. If you donít have one already add a carpet cleaning kit to your list for your next shopping run. Youíll want cleaner, a scraper, a bristle brush and a microfiber cloth. And, perhaps most importantly, keep all of these items together and on hand. The last thing youíll want is to dig through your cleaning closet like mad while a wine stain is happily settling in.

How to steam - To truly maintain carpeting youíll want to plan to have it professionally steamed at least once a year. For DIY-ers skip using store-bought solutions designed to be mixed with the water. This might seem counterintuitive but they tend to leave behind soapy residue which further attracts more dirt. As you can imagine this creates an unnecessary codependent cycle that I have a hunch youíd prefer to skip! You will also want to be mindful of how much water you use as you clean; use caution to not use so much that the carpet can no longer truly dry fully. If this sounds like too much to keep in mind youíll find hiring a professional well worth the yearly investment.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Todd Finn on 5/13/2018

When you're a homeowner, it's tempting to save money any way you can. Oftentimes people take repairs into their own hands when they don't have the knowledge or experience to complete the job safely. What begins as a way to save money can quickly turn into a disaster--as you spend lengthy periods of time on a project and find yourself going over your initial budget. It isn't always easy to know which projects you can attempt yourself and which ones are better left to the pros. And, of course, it will depend on your comfort and skill level when it comes to various household repairs. So, if you're a plumber, disregard our plumbing advice and dive in to your DIY plumbing projects since you have the know-how. But if you're an average homeowner looking to make some renovations and repairs, read on to find out which ones you should attempt and which ones are better left to the pros.

1. Electrical work

So you've got a few faulty outlets in the new home you bought. It doesn't seem worth calling in an electrician just for those few minor issues. However, due to the dangers and complications that can arise from electric work, it's a good idea to hold off and call in the experts. Aside from shocking yourself (which can be deadly), you could also create fire hazards or damage circuitry, resulting in much higher repair costs than you initially had. Another benefit of calling in an electrician, other than having the project done correctly, is that they will be able to diagnose your home circuitry to let you know what other problems might arise in the foreseeable future.†So, when it comes to power issues, always call in the pros.

2. Hazardous materials

Many people will tell you not to worry about asbestos or lead paint unless you have children. However, these are both dangerous materials than can create several chronic health problems in adults as well. If you're concerned for the safety of yourself and your family, call in contractors who will remove the lead or asbestos. What can go wrong if you try to do it yourself? Lead chips and dust will fly through the air when attempting to remove lead paint. Breathing in these fumes is dangerous initially and down the road when the dust settles into the corners of your home. Asbestos, especially in blown-in insulation can be particularly dangerous. Aside from ensuring your safety, a contractor will also be able to assess the situation and determine whether your hazardous materials need to be removed or can just be "repaired" or covered up. Simple repair jobs on asbestos or lead-containing objects can save you some serious time and money.

3. Roofing and siding

There's a reason even building contractors bring in third party companies to install roofs and siding. These are both labor-intensive and time-intensive jobs that require specialized skills and tools that only dedicated companies can accomplish correctly. Roofing and siding are both dangerous jobs that carry the risk of falling off of roofs and ladders, as well as injuring your back lifting heavy shingles. The pros have the tools and experience to avoid these injuries. When you hire the professionals to do your roofing or siding, you can rest assured that the job is done correctly and will last much longer than if you made it a DIY project as well.





Posted by Todd Finn on 5/6/2018

Buying a home is one of those things in life that requires you to take a certain order of steps to complete the process. First, youíll need to save up some money for a down payment and all of the other costs that go along with buying a home. Next, youíll take a look at what you can afford and perhaps get pre-qualified. Then, youíll hire a realtor and begin searching for properties. Finally, youíll make an offer, sign for the mortgage and close on the home. After that, youíll probably buy some furniture and paint the walls to make yourself feel at home. 


Would you ever dream of making that big home purchase without actually seeing the property first? One of the most time-consuming parts of the home buying process is that of viewing homes and visiting property after property. 


There are actually many reasons that a buyer might buy a property without seeing it first. With the Internet, itís fairly easy to get an idea of what a house might be like. Too, if youíre an investor, itís sometimes worth the gamble to scoop up a property at the right price in order to score a great deal. 


Itís also usually not detrimental to buyers who are trying to get a home in a high competition market to go after places they really love immediately. The early bird does get the worm, right?


Foreclosed Properties 


Properties in distress may be in poor condition, but for the right buyer can be a great deal. Banks want to get rid of these places as soon as possible due to the expenses incurred by keeping them. 


Pre-Construction Properties


Not all properties that are bought sight unseen are fixer uppers. Some properties can be bought in the pre-construction phase. These homes havenít been built but are already on the market available for purchase. Many times, buying properties this way can be cheaper than buying the new construction home after itís built. 


The Risks


There are obviously many risks to buying a home sight unseen. First, pictures can be deceiving. You never really know what youíre walking into until you see it. Photographs can easily hide major damage. Until a home is physically inspected, you may not know what the costs will be to repair it. 


The same risks apply to new construction homes. The layout of the home may not be what youíre looking for, or the home may not include the features that you want.


When you do decide to buy a home sight unseen you need to weigh the risk versus the reward in the transaction. It can be a valuable decision, in the long run, to take a chance on buying a home that you havenít been able to physically inspect.       

 





Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Todd Finn on 5/4/2018

This Single-Family in Peabody, MA recently sold for $455,000. This Split Entry style home was sold by Todd Finn - RE/MAX Partners.


10 Dartmouth Street, Peabody, MA 01960

Single-Family

$485,000
Price
$455,000
Sale Price

8
Rooms
3
Beds
1/1
Full/Half Baths
Large split entry home in the Pilgrim Heights Neighborhood of Peabody (up the hill and opposite Lowe Mart Shopping Plaza). Plenty of room for everyone in this 3-4 bedroom home. Centrally located with easy access to Routes 1 and 95. Close to Peabody High, restaurants and shopping. Equipped with a stair lift for ease of mobility. There is great hardwood flooring throughout most of the main level--and it is in nice shape! Cozy country style kitchen with lots of cabinet space. Lower level features a large family room with fireplace and a big enclosed sun room for entertaining. Another large room features a built in bar, a half bath, a separate workshop, a potential 4th bedroom and laundry room. Two refrigerators, plus a newer upright freezer and washer/dryer are all included. Heating source is on natural gas. Lower level could be opened up again to make a 2 car garage. Larger than it looks.

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Categories: Sold Homes  


Posted by Todd Finn on 4/29/2018

Window shutters are a very old form of home improvement. Since there have been windows or openings in the walls of houses, shutters have been around. While they donít serve much of a practical purpose in the present day, they once were very important to homeowners.  Early shutters were meant to protect the interior of a home from things like intruders, weather, and animals. 


Ornamentation


Present day shutters are often used as the finishing touch for a home. Many homes just wouldnít look complete without them on the outside of the house. So, how do you find the shutters that are right for your home?


The Size And Placement Of The Shutters


You need room on your house for shutters to work on it. You shouldnít consider putting shutters on your home if the pieces will come too close to the corner or stick out beyond the trim of your home. Your windows also shouldnít be too close together. The space between windows and shutters should be about half of the width of one shutter. If you donít have the appropriate space, you shouldnít put shutters up. Even though youíre not actually using the shutters for practical purposes, you want them to look authentic, as if they could actually be closed. Keep in mind too that a small window may only need one shutter to make it work.


The Hardware 


Even though you wonít actually be using the shutters for your home, they should always be hung with the proper hardware. This allows the shutters to be attached appropriately and give the authentic look thatís needed to make them look true to form. If the shutters are hung any other way, they run the risk of looking cheap and fake. Even though youíre not actually going to use the shutters, the right hardware makes them function as they would if you really needed them.  


The Materials


As far as materials go, real wood shutters are unmatched in their authentic look. The problem with real wood shutters is that they can become weathered quickly. If you go with wood shutters, they will require frequent painting and replacement, which can become a tedious task as a homeowner.  


Vinyl shutters will last longer but choose them carefully. You still want a high quality shutter even though this material will be able to withstand the weather longer. The better the quality of your shutter, the more genuine they will look on your home. 


Color Choice


Typically, the color scheme on the outside of a home includes 2-3 different colors. Your shutters should be the accent color of the home. This means that they should match some other color thatís present on the outside of the house whether itís your front door or your window trim, the shutters should always be a different color than the siding of a home.




Tags: shutters   home exterior  
Categories: Uncategorized